Monday, March 5, 2012

ADOT Five Year Construction Program available for comment

Take a look at the tentative Five-Year Transportation Facilities
Construction Program
and give us your feedback.
Arizona’s transportation system has evolved over the past 100 years from a series of unpaved roads into a robust network of highways, airports and transit systems equipped with the latest technology and innovations.

But, that transformation didn’t happen by accident ... it took plenty of work and a whole lot of planning.  

Planning is just as vital today as it was back then and at ADOT we’re always looking ahead.

Which brings us to the topic of today’s blog post ... the Five-Year Transportation Facilities Construction Program.

This is a plan that basically serves as a blue print covering a five-year span to detail where, when and how regional, state and federal funding will be spent for future projects. Since Arizona is a big state with lots of needs and because transportation projects come with high costs, ADOT needs to prioritize which projects move forward first.

The five-year program is created through collaboration that all begins with a long-range visioning process (kind of a “big-picture” look at the next 40 years). Next, a more realistic 20-year plan is developed and from there, the five-year program is created.

Three public hearings are scheduled. 
Click on image for larger view.
The five-year program is updated each year and because budgets are uncertain, the first two years are always fiscally constrained, meaning they’re based on an expected budget. The remaining three years are built on budget estimates.

After a thorough public hearing process, the State Transportation Board considers and adopts the five-year program.

A quick look at the 2013-2017 program
For 2013 through 2017, the total for the highway portion of the five-year program is tentatively set at $940 million a year to preserve, modernize and improve our state’s highways. That is down from the $1.1 billion per year from the last five-year program, due primarily to the decline in funding resulting from a weak economy.

Of the total amount of funding estimated over the next five years, about half is designated for the Metro Phoenix region, in part because of the Valley’s half-cent sales tax for transportation projects, approved by voters in 2004.

Approximately $126 million is designated for aviation projects in the five-year program.

We want to hear from you!
You can get a complete look at the tentative five-year program now ... it's online and we welcome your feedback. You can email us at fiveyearconstructionprogram@azdot.gov. 

We also invite you to check out the “how to read it” guide!

If you'd rather give your feedback in person, or you want to talk with an ADOT representative face-to-face, public hearings will be conducted on March 16 in Tucson, April 20 in Flagstafff and May 18 in Phoenix (see above for details).

Members of the State Transportation Board will consider comments received by May 18 when they formally adopt the program in June.

62 comments:

  1. So where is the Draft Plan link so you can review the plan?

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    Replies
    1. Good afternoon,
      We link to the draft plan in a few spots within the blog post above, but you can also find it here:
      http://mpd.azdot.gov/mpd/priority_Programming/PDF/tentative.pdf

      Hope this helps ... and thanks for reading the ADOT Blog!

      Delete
  2. Where is a map that we can look at to more easily see where and what is being done.

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    Replies
    1. Here is a link to a map showing the state highway system and mileposts ... hope this helps!
      http://www.azdot.gov/mpd/gis/maps/pdf/mps.pdf

      Delete
  3. "The page cannot be found" , error 404.
    Typical for the gov't. !

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  4. Albert Vetere LannonMarch 5, 2012 at 5:59 PM

    No I-10 Bypass in the Avra Valley!
    No I-11 in the Avra Valley!
    No increase in gas taxes and no new taxes on fuel!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good afternoon, Albert.
      At the December 19, 2008 State Transportation Board meeting, the board approved an I-10 Major Investment Study (MIS) to explore all options and come up with a comprehensive, multimodal transportation solution, which could include an alternative route around the Greater Tucson area.

      At this time, no funding has been identified for the I-10 MIS and there is no new information specific to the I-10 Bypass Study.

      Delete
  5. Did you forget about us in Gold Canyon?
    We have one road in and one road out.
    Still waiting for a bypass...............
    Someday there will be a crisis and ADOT will be
    getting the blame.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Funny to hear about people that were lured into the outskirts because of cheeep home prices, and then complain that things aren't as convenient as in living in more central locations.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous (5:41 p.m.):
      Thank you for your comments.
      The design concept study of a realignment of US 60 around Gold Canyon is complete, but there is no funding identified to construct the project in the next five years.

      Delete
  6. Is is ADOT's goal to pave the entire valley with 10 lane hwys? And is it really necessary to plant fully matured palm trees lining the on/off ramps? How about investing in education instead?

    Widening 17 to Flagstaff would be a nice thing too.

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    1. Anonymous (7:34 p.m.):

      Thank you for your comments on the five-year program.

      The planning for the regional freeway system in Maricopa County is done by the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG). The membership of MAG includes all of the local governments in Maricopa County.

      Highway construction and maintenance is funded by the state gas tax, the federal gas tax, vehicle license fees, and the 1/2 cent sales tax in Maricopa County. The revenues cannot be used for any other purpose such as education.

      Planning for the improvement of two segments of I-17 between Phoenix and Flagstaff is almost complete:

      SR 179 (Sedona Turnoff) to I-40

      New River to SR 69 (Cordes Junction)

      Funding is proposed in 2015 to prepare the construction plans for improvements between Rock Springs and Cordes Junction.

      Delete
  7. We need a better way to get from San Tan Valley into the Scottsdale and Phoenix areas. With only Ellsworth/Hunt Hwy getting in and out, we are TOTALLY ISOLATED out here. DO SOMETHING ABOUT THIS, WE ARE TAXPAYERS TOO!

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    Replies
    1. your fault for moving out there :)

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    2. What road did you drive in on when you moved there?

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    3. Construction of the first segment of State Route 24, between Loop 202 and Ellsworth Road, will begin soon.

      The new highway is planned to extend eastward past Gateway Airport, but the precise route though Pinal County has not been established. More information can be found on the project webpage.

      Delete
  8. Thank you for sharing this informative tentative Transportation Plan. I would've hoped there would be more improvements to the highway systems in the Tucson area. I see from some of the above comments the Libtards are still busy opinioning without reading anything. Don't take their junk too seriously.

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    1. Anonymous (8:41 p.m.):

      Thank you for commenting on the five-year program. We wanted to let you know of the following improvements that are under construction or planned in the Tucson area:

      Current construction:
      I-10, Ruthrauff to Prince – widening I-10 to four lanes in each direction and constructing a bridge to take Prince Road over the highway and the railroad tracks.

      Proposed improvements:
      * I-10/Ruthrauff Road – reconstruct traffic interchange and widen the highway.
      * I-10/Ina Road – reconstruct traffic interchange, elevate Ina Road over the highway and railroad tracks, and widen the highway.

      Delete
  9. Please build a bypass south of maricopa/Casa grande for trucks that are traveling from Tucson to California.

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    1. Uh, there is one already - it's called I-8....

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    2. Anonymous (9:09 p.m.):

      It is possible for any vehicle going from Tucson to California to bypass the Phoenix are by using Interstate 8 to Gila Bend and then State Route 85 to I-10.

      Delete
  10. Do not use taxpayer monies to augment Rosemont Copper's plan to destroy the Scenic SR 83 between Vail and Sonoita!!!!

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    1. Is there copper in the car you drive to work in?

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    2. Answer: There are many sources of copper... it doesn't have to come from the proposed Rosemont mine!

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    3. Anonymous (6:27 a.m.):

      There is no funding to widen State Route 83 in the Tentative Five-Year Construction Program. Long-term planning is taking place should the highway need to be improved in the future.

      Delete
  11. First two things. Number one there isn't a pedestrian bridge in Tombstone therefore you don't need to spend money to remove it. Number two the I-10 bridge at Cienega creek needs replacement, and BTW the train bridge is still there. Finally I would like to see the widening of I-10 project to continue to the New Mexico border.

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    1. that Ped OC was removed 3 or 4 years ago paid for privately, not state funds. it is currently stored at the Tombstone 'airport'

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    2. Anonymous (7:34 p.m.):

      Thank you for your comments.

      The pedestrian bridge in Tombstone was removed several years ago, but the stairs that provided access to the bridge were left in place. The funding in the Tentative Program is for the removal of the stairs on both sides of the highway.

      Funding is in the program this year for Phase III of the Cienega Creek - Marsh Station project. It will include the relocation of the railroad line north of I-10, removal of the railroad bridge, and reconstruction of I-10 between Cienega Creek and Marsh Station.

      Delete
  12. Earth First ... we'll mine the other planets later.

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  13. Is the plan supposed to contain transportation methods that are not dependent on oil? Are other accesses such as bike paths between cities in Maricopa County considered? Rail connections intra-city, intra-state, and interstate? This looks like the car and airplane industries got hold of the plan and eliminated competition for transportation services and capabilities. It looks like the same plan when gasoline and diesel were under $2 a gallon.

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    1. Sure, you are going to ride your bike from Glendale to Mesa in August at noon. Follow the money... It comes from taxes on gasoline and diesel. ADOT does not need to manage people on bikes.

      Delete
    2. Hi Mike,

      Thank you for your comments.

      ADOT is currently conducting a study of high-speed passenger rail between Phoenix and Tucson.

      Delete
  14. There needs to be some type of prioritization in this plan. Although I'm sure most of the routes identified need attention; traffic volume, type of traveler (Semi, vehicles in tow, motorcycle traffic etc.) A motorcycle is much more susceptible to injury or a fatality when roads are in disrepair. Hwy 88 and the Apache Trail are being ignored which negatively impacts tourism, economic development, sustainability of business which feed into the coffers of the state. Please start thinking like a business rather than an overfunded government entity.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Anonymous (11:47 a.m.):

      Thank you for your comments.

      ADOT looks at a number of factors when establishing priorities for allocations of its limited resources. The most critical factors are traffic volumes and congestion.

      SR 88 (The Apache Trail) was designated a historic road years ago and the decision was made to leave it in its original condition.

      The tentative program has funding to repave nine miles of the paved portion of SR 88 between Apache Junction and Tortilla Flat in 2013.

      Delete
  15. I'm pretty sure when they were asking for feedback and listed an email address, they were expecting you to send email, not bitch and moan here for everyone else to read. Thanks ADOT for putting this out here for us to review.

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  16. We need a high way or free way between Pecos Rd to 51st Ave, to Baseline!!

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    1. Thank you for your comment.

      Currently, ADOT is finishing the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Location and Design Concept Report for South Mountain Freeway, which is a proposed freeway that would extend from I-10 in the East Valley (along Pecos Road) to I-10 in the West Valley (along 59th Avenue).

      Funding for the South Mountain Freeway was approved by voters in November 2004 as part of the Regional Transportation Program, and is included in the five-year program. Once the Draft EIS is approved by the Federal Highway Administration, it will be available for public review in early 2013.

      Information and maps of the proposed South Mountain Freeway are available on the study web site.

      Delete
  17. There are so many worthy projects in Arizona that fall under ADOT's direction, and I truly believe we have the nicest freeways in the country. That being said, it is time for once and for all, to give up on building the 202 through the Ahwatukee area. This has been a extremely poorly designed project from the beginning, and as time has passed, the area has changed. I just feel that the price (on many fronts) has greatly exceeded the benefit. Do I have to even mention the impact on our GRIC neighboors?? The abuse of our native american peoples has to end sometime, and forever changing their environment by "remodeling South Mountain" with dynamite just furthers the terrible history between the two parties. There are a plethora of other worthy, community supported projects that deserve our resources; it is time ADOT admits the truth on this one...

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    1. Thank you for your comments on the five-year program.

      The South Mountain Freeway has been a critical part of the Maricopa Association of Governments’ Regional Freeway Program since it was first included in funding approved by Maricopa County voters in 1985. It was part of the Regional Transportation Plan funding passed by Maricopa County voters in 2004 through Proposition 400. The proposed South Mountain Freeway will provide an important link between the southeast and southwest areas of the Valley and an alternative route to I-10.

      Currently, ADOT is finishing the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Location and Design Concept Report for South Mountain Freeway. Once the Draft EIS is approved by the Federal Highway Administration, it will be available for public review in early 2013.There will be 90 days to submit comments on the draft study. All comments received during this 90-day comment period will become part of the Final EIS and replied to by the South Mountain Freeway study team. The study team encourages you to submit comments on the study during the 90-day comment period.

      ADOT recognizes the sovereign status and self-determination of the Gila River Indian Community. ADOT will continue working with and respectfully listening to GRIC’s elected leadership and citizens, as well as provide opportunities for all interested parties to submit public comment on the study.

      More information about South Mountain Freeway can be found on the study web site.

      Delete
  18. I appreciate that we can have an input. The way Obama has been running things, that isn't the case. I'd like to have more double highway between Payson and Heber, but I realize that there are not as many people involved with this, so know that most of it goes to the cities. There is a lot of travel between this 2 towns though, as people from the valley like to get out of the heat and go to the mountains. Thanks again for letting us have an input.

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    1. Anonymous (5:24 a.m.)

      Thank you for your comments.

      ADOT’s first priority for the improvement of State Route 260 between Payson and Show Low is to complete the upgrade to a four-lane highway between Star Valley and the top of the Mogollon Rim. The fifth of six projects through Doubtful Canyon will be completed this fall. The sixth and final project just east of Star Valley is proposed to be funded in 2016.

      The next priority will be the segment from Overgaard to Show Low. ADOT is just completing a design concept study that outlines a plan to improve the highway. There is no funding proposed for this segment in the next five years.

      Delete
  19. Finish the Dixileta bridge! it would save thousands of dollars a year just in the extra gas mileage to get to the transfer station...so let me get this straight...you completed the bridge for sonoran blvd. that goes nowhere but you can't complete a bridge that is very functional...not to mention wasting money on a pedestrian bridge next to dixileta...get your head out of your tail and finish what you started or start putting out the hottest fire!

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    1. Thank you for your comments.

      To answer your question about the Dixileta interchange, it is complete. It is what is called a “half-diamond interchange,” and the reason it is built this way is safety. In the future the Loop 303 will be a major system interchange of two freeways and because of it’s proximity to Dixileta, about one mile, ADOT did not build either a northbound on-ramp or a southbound off-ramp because this could cause weaving on the interstate and could potentially cause accidents.

      The Sonoran Blvd. interchange was a component of the I-17 widening project that the construction of was accelerated and funded by the city of Phoenix in advance of development of the area.

      The Central Arizona Project Canal pedestrian bridge was built as a mitigating factor through the environmental study as part of the I-17 widening project a few years ago. There is a trail alongside the CAP canal that anyone can use, the pedestrian bridge will allow trail users to continue hiking, biking, etc. over I-17.

      Delete
  20. Where's the South Mountain Freeway? With these gas prices, getting around Laveen, Tempe, and Ahwatukee is more expensive than ever -- especially when making deliveries, etc.

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    1. Thank you for your comments on the five-year program.

      The South Mountain Freeway has been a critical part of the Maricopa Association of Government’s Regional Freeway Program since it was first included in funding approved by Maricopa County voters in 1985. It was part of the Regional Transportation Plan funding passed by Maricopa County voters in 2004 through Proposition 400. The proposed South Mountain Freeway will provide an important link between the southeast and southwest areas of the Valley and an alternative route to I-10.

      Currently, ADOT is finishing the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Location and Design Concept Report for South Mountain Freeway. Once the Draft EIS is approved by the Federal Highway Administration, it will be available for public review in early 2013. All comments received during this 90-day comment period will become part of the Final EIS and replied to by the South Mountain Freeway study team. The study team encourages you to submit comments on the study during the 90-day comment period.

      More information about South Mountain Freeway can be found on the study web site.

      Delete
  21. Let's see - San Tan Valley? Not even an officially named place - must be like one of those Anthems! You moved there and now you want the rest of us to pay for roads to get you in and out at your convenience? NOT....besides, that is a job for the county, not ADOT....ADOT's priority should be to construct and maintain for the greatest good - now and beyond the end of everyone's nose today! Most of you folks have absolutely no idea what ADOT is responsible for - it's not making bike paths for a select few - read their mission statement - yes, it's dealing with 'intermodal' transportation issues, but the majority of their focus is on highway travel - gas taxes fuel transportation infrastructure - bicycles don't contribute to those sources of funding - sorry. Many, many times, the right side of ADOT has no clue what the left side is doing, therefore you end up with stupid projects like removal of a bridge that was actually done many years ago - they are heavy on those with the pocket protectors but lacking those with true vision and a total understanding of what's going on outside their darkened room in Phoenix......

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  22. The plan to realign Hwy 60 near Gold Canyon is bad. Don't spend money on such a project!

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  23. By the way, that's not a pedestrian bridge over I-17 - that's for the CAP Canal access road so the CAP security forces can get over the freeway - it's a single lane roadway and won't be open to the public as a pedestrian bridge - the access road along the CAP Canal isn't open to the public either....CAP is paying for the bridge, not ADOT - might want to check facts before you post and get everyone upset about something that isn't true.....

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for your comments.

      The Central Arizona Project canal pedestrian bridge is open to the public, specifically CAP canal trail-users.

      For more information about the CAP Trail,
      visit the Central Arizona Project website.

      The bridge will link the trail over I-17 and will accommodate pedestrians and cyclists, not vehicles.

      The bridge project is part of a mitigation agreement that ADOT and CAP reached as part of the widening and improvement of I-17 through the area. The bridge is paid for with federal transportation funds set aside for enhancements projects, it was not paid for by the CAP canal authority.

      Delete
  24. Issues:

    #1 - Reconstruction of Eherenberg Rest Area for $17MM? Really? Why?

    #2 - West Quartzsite TI for $6.6MM? There is nothing wrong with that intersection.

    #3 - Don't spend our money on I-15. Nevada and Utah should.

    #4 - Escalate the progress on US 93

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous (7:14 p.m.)

      Thanks for your comments. Here are some answers to your questions...

      1) Reconstruction of Eherenberg Rest Area: This funding is not for a rest area, it is for the Ehrenberg Port of Entry. The Ports of Entry operated by ADOT perform a vital function to ensure that large trucks are in good working condition and not overweight. The Ehrenberg Port of Entry needs to be expanded to accommodate increasing truck volumes and it needs to have the latest technology installed.

      2) West Quartzsite TI: There is a problem with the capacity of the West Quartzsite Traffic Interchange. The adjacent truck stop attracts many large trucks, which exit at the interchange and back up onto I-10. The project will increase the capacity of the interchange and address the safety problem.

      3) I-15: ADOT is in discussions with Nevada and Utah on a regional approach to the improvement of I-15.

      4) US 93:The tentative program proposes funding to improve two more segments of US 93 between Wikeiup and I-40. Funding is also proposed to prepare the construction plans for the final segment.

      Delete
  25. I've recently heard rumors in the Heber-Overgaard area that there is a plan for a north bypass around the city, joining with 277 on the north.

    I don't see that in this 5 year plan, but should it come up in the future a couple of thoughts. 1) this will negatively impact the local economy, and we're losing population already from a lack of jobs. 2) I bought into a nice area in the trees on the north-east of that area to live in the rest of my life. I expected the current peace and quiet living next to the national forest to remain, where we can open our windows and hear nothing but the wind in the trees.

    I, and a bunch of my neighbors, will be seriously impacted if a bypass replaces that quiet with 24/7 freeway noise. The existing segment of SR260 through town is quite sufficient with zero stop lights or stop signs, and is never congested to the point of slowing traffic.

    There are better places to spend ADOT money, for example, pave the existing dirt roads between Heber and Winslow and reduce travel time between those cities by nearly an hour.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous (March 31),
      Thank you for your comments. ADOT has no plans to construct a bypass around Heber and Overgaard.

      Delete
  26. Angela, I am concerned about the reworking of I-17 from Dunlap south. We attended the October public meeting and two alternatives were presented. The first would take half of my lot, and the second would take my neighbor's, mine and half of my other neighbor's.

    What kind of time line are we looking at here? If it is twenty years off, I am not too concerned, but five or six years off would be a problem.

    Bob Gill

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    1. Anonymous (May 31):
      Thanks for your patience. Here's what I found out...

      ADOT is currently still proceeding with the I-17 Corridor Improvement Study, including presenting potential alignments at public hearings later this year.

      However, recently the Maricopa Association of Governments adopted a reprioritization of the Regional Transportation Plan that included shifting money programmed for the I-17 CIS and moving it to other projects.

      The latest funding scenario shows I-17 money becoming available in years 2022 to 2026. Additionally, there’s no way to know at this time which section of I-17 we would start with, so at this time we can’t narrow it down any further by specific areas.

      Learn more about the MAG reprioritization plan, here.

      And to sign up to receive email updates regarding I-17, including information about the CIS, visit www.ValleyFreeways.com.

      Delete
  27. Angela, I checked with Mr. Jacoby, and there is no public meeting scheduled this fall to discuss this project. So, I guess barring any massive infusion of Obamabucks, the 2022 to 2026 timeline is what we will live with.

    Given that long lead time, I am going to plant some peach and plum trees and paint my chicken coop. By the time ADOT takes my property, I will probably be long gone.

    Robert Gill

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  28. It's pointless building more bike lanes unless the Police actually start enforcing the bike lane laws. I cycle to work everyday, and everyday I'm forced out of the bike lane and into traffic because some jogger thinks it's okay to run in the bike lane.

    I'm tired of reading about cyclists being killed or injured because they were forced out of the bike lanes. ARS title 26 is there to protect us, but it can do that unless the authorities start to enforce the law.

    ADOT needs to run a media campaign to inform people that it's illegal for anyone to be in the bike lane unless they're on a bike... otherwise cyclists will continue to die!

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  29. Angela,
    I'm cusious if there has ever been consideration given to the following two possibilities:

    1.- An extension of SR 260 from Clarkdale to Chino Valley to improve travel (trucks included) from Prescott to the Verde Valley.

    2.- A connector from US 93 near Wikiup to Lake Havasu City to improve drive times from Phoenix and the central highlands to Lake Havasu.

    Thank you for your time.

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    Replies
    1. Good morning, SRT.
      I don't have an immediate answer for you, but I'll look into it and let you know what I learn...

      Stay tuned!

      Delete
    2. Here's what I learned...

      ADOT has looked at several transportation options and modes throughout the state as a part of a transportation visioning plan called 'Building a Quality Arizona' (BqAz). The routes that you have shared don’t appear to have been selected, but that doesn't mean they weren't considered as a part of this visioning exercise.

      To learn more about future transportation options through BqAz, please visit bqaz.gov.

      Thank you for taking the time to share these highway route considerations ... ADOT also believes it is important to look at all transportation possibilities!

      Delete

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